Wednesday, May 22

Sports

How tennis inequality lets women down: Prize money, scheduling and Saudi Arabia
Sports

How tennis inequality lets women down: Prize money, scheduling and Saudi Arabia

This article is part of the launch of extended tennis coverage on The Athletic, which will go beyond the baseline to bring you the biggest stories on and off the court. To follow the tennis vertical, click here.Last month at the Madrid Open, Coco Gauff was warming up on the least desirable practice courts when she saw some male players — without small numbers next to their names — on the much better courts.Gauff is familiar with the misogynist history of the tournament. She partnered with compatriot Jessica Pegula against Victoria Azarenka and Beatriz Haddad Maia in the women’s doubles final in 2023, after Azarenka and other players commented on unfair scheduling and the size disparity of birthday cakes for Carlos Alcaraz and Aryna Sabalenka. Officials refused to let the foursome speak aft...
It’s time for the NHL to stop interference and offside reviews
Sports

It’s time for the NHL to stop interference and offside reviews

The symmetry was almost perfect.In the history of the NHL’s foray into the world of replay review, there are two moments that stand out as crucial landmarks, the key signposts that pointed us toward where we wound up. The most recent came in 2013, when Colorado center Matt Duchene scored a goal despite being roughly a mile offside.The play is, to this day, widely misunderstood. The linesman didn’t somehow miss the fact that Duchene was offside; rather, he thought that the Nashville Predators had directed the puck back into their own zone, which would negate an offside call. But the optics were terrible. Everything about the play looked wrong, up to and including Duchene’s muted celebration. He knew he’d gotten away with one, as did everyone watching. And, eventually, the confusion and frus...
Could MLB nationalize its media rights? Why some clubs are pushing to end local TV deals
Sports

Could MLB nationalize its media rights? Why some clubs are pushing to end local TV deals

Sixty years ago, baseball commissioner Ford Frick received a telegram from a Wisconsin congressman. Rep. Henry Reuss was worried the Milwaukee Braves would defect to Atlanta for the promise of a richer television contract, and proposed a fix: if all the Major League Baseball teams would share their television money, then the Braves might stay.According to the Associated Press, Frick replied in that summer of 1964 that “… a plan to pool all television receipts would not be feasible or acceptable at this time,” but would be “worthy of future consideration.”Now, in 2024, that conversation has arrived. Commissioner Rob Manfred and some of the sport’s owners are more seriously talking about nationalizing baseball’s TV rights than ever before. Not because of relocation, but because of cord-cutti...
Scottie Scheffler live updates: World No 1 starts round despite arrest for assault of a police officer at PGA Championship
Sports

Scottie Scheffler live updates: World No 1 starts round despite arrest for assault of a police officer at PGA Championship

The police report of this morning’s incident which led to Scottie Scheffler’s arrest has been published. It reads: 💬 “Detective Gillis was directing traffic into Gate 1 of the Valhalla Golf Course due to the road being closed in both directions from an earlier fatal collision. Listed subject was driving eastbound to gain access to the course. “Subject pulled into the westbound lanes, where outbound traffic was flowing and to avoid backed up traffic. Detective Gillis was in the middle of the westbound lanes, in full LMPD uniform and a hi-visibility yellow reflective rain jacket. “Detective Gillis stopped subject and attempted to give instructions. Subject refused to comply and accelerated forward, dragging Detective Gillis to the ground. “Detective Gillis suffered pain, swelling, and abrasi...
Can MLB save the starting pitcher? The search for solutions to baseball’s ‘existential crisis’
Sports

Can MLB save the starting pitcher? The search for solutions to baseball’s ‘existential crisis’

Who’s pitching tonight?For 100 years, that wasn’t just a casual question. It was the question that defined baseball.The answer always had a chance to give you goosebumps. Maybe it was Tom Seaver versus Steve Carlton. Maybe it was Sandy Koufax versus Bob Gibson. Maybe it was Pedro Martinez versus Randy Johnson.They weren’t just a reason to watch. They were the reason to watch. They threw the first pitch of the game. They often stuck around to throw the last pitch of the game. When the stars hold the ball in their hands 100 times a game, from the first minute of a game to the last, that’s where so much of the magic comes from. But now, those nights of pitchers’ duel magic are slipping away.Ten active major-league starting pitchers have won a Cy Young Award — and nine of them have spent time ...
Tennis Briefing: Djokovic, a water bottle, and so many injuries in Rome
Sports

Tennis Briefing: Djokovic, a water bottle, and so many injuries in Rome

Welcome to the Monday Tennis Briefing, where The Athletic will explain the story behind the stories from the last week on court. This week, the coveted Masters 1000 in Rome ran its first week and the stories on court were matched by the drama off it. Novak Djokovic exited, struck by a water bottle, Rafael Nadal took the next step in his comeback, and the on-court spectacle was overtaken by some strange umpiring.And is everybody injured now?If you’d like to follow our fantastic tennis coverage, please click here.Are all these injuries signal or noise?Friday lunchtime in Rome and the Foro Italico briefly felt like an infirmary, as one medical bulletin followed another.First, defending champion Elena Rybakina withdrew because of illness, before the first matches of the day on the Campo Centra...